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  1. New Cretaceous dinosaur from Queensland

    Researchers have announced the naming of Savannasaurus elliottorum, a new genus and species of dinosaur from western Queensland, Australia. The bones come from the Winton Formation, a geological deposit approximately 95 million years old. Savannasaurus was a medium-sized titanosaur, approximately half the length of a basketball court, with a long neck and a relatively short tail.
  2. Earliest evidence in fossil record for right-handedness

    Perhaps the bias against left-handers dates back much further than we thought. By examining striations on teeth of a Homo habilis fossil, researchers have found the earliest evidence for right-handedness in the fossil record dating back 1.8 million years.
  3. Turning biofuel waste into wealth in a single step

    Lignin is a bulky chain of molecules found in wood and is usually discarded during biofuel production. But in a new method to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, the simple addition of formaldehyde could turn it into the main focus.
  4. Jet lag treatment? Blast of thin air can reset circadian clocks

    We might not think of our circadian clock until we are jetlagged, but scientists continue to puzzle over what drives our biological timepiece. Now, a study has found that variations in surrounding oxygen levels can reset circadian clocks of mice. If confirmed in humans, the research could help inform how airlines moderate cabin air pressure.
  5. New perovskite solar cell design could outperform existing commercial technologies

    A new design for solar cells that uses inexpensive, commonly available materials could rival and even outperform conventional cells made of silicon. In a new article, researchers describe using tin and other abundant elements to create novel forms of perovskite -- a photovoltaic crystalline material that's thinner, more flexible and easier to manufacture than silicon crystals.